Mileposts 300’s – Blue Ridge Parkway

BlueRidge-MP300-motorhome

Me at one of the pull-offs in the 300s milepost range

Asheville, NC
Biltmore Estate
Chimney Rock
Craggy Gardens
Crabtree Meadows
Linville Falls
Grandfather Mountain
Grandfather Campground
Flat Rock Trail
Grandfather Mountain Overlook
Linn Cove Viaduct

June, 2007: Here are links and info of things we explored along the Blue Ridge Parkway mileposts 300-200, heading north toward Shenandoah National Park.

August, 2017: I’m switching these older html pages to WordPress format and updating links.

Click all images below for larger size in separate window.

Milepost 390
Beautiful Asheville, NC

Guides to Asheville:
Explore Asheville.com

Asheville.com

This has got to be one of the prettiest little towns around. A week was just not enough, but at that point it wasn’t meant as a destination itself, but as a stop along the Parkway. I already want to return and give it more attention next time!

KOA-Asheville-EastWhere I stayed (June 18-23, 2007): A fellow RVer had recommended the KOA Asheville East as a convenient location from which to explore the things I wanted to see in Asheville. It was all that, with all the conveniences I enjoy when returning home exhausted from all that sightseeing! It’s also a pretty park itself on the Swannanoa River.


Milepost 389
Biltmore Estate

1 Appproach Road ♦ Asheville, NC ♦ 800-624-1575

Biltmore-MeMy first visit to this incredible estate was at Christmas time during my first year of fulltiming in 2001. I remember being absolutely amazed that a man-made thing could be so beautiful. I was so fascinated with both the home and gardens that I had to return. I did a separate page to try do it justice with all the pictures I wanted to share.  Here is page about 2007 visit until I get around to updating it.

Milepost 385
Chimney Rock

431 Main St. ♦ Chimney Rock, NC ♦ 800-277-9611

chimneyrock-media

I was intrigued from the time I first saw this picture. I knew I just had to see and feel for myself what it’s like up there!

ChimneyRock-Me HikingI hiked in an area where scenes from The Last of the Mohicans was filmed. That’s one of my favorite movie scores and I had it running through my head the whole time I was here.

Here’s link to original June, 2007 page with pics of that exhilarating hike.

And this MaliasRV page with my mom.

Milepost 364
Craggy Gardens

Craggy-entrance This was one of the stops I was most looking forward to after hearing of the purple rhododendron covered slopes from mid to late June. I based my departure date on this, but nature didn’t cooperate this year due to a late freeze. Oh well…it was a pretty stop anyway.

There were a few colorful bushes and at least the Mountain Laurel was still showing off in style. There’s a short nature trail to Craggy Flats from here that’s well worth the 10 minutes it takes to walk it.

Coming north, you’ll come across a sign to Craggy Gardens Picnic Area a couple of miles before the Visitors Center. It’s about a mile long road and is pretty tight with one hairpin curve thrown in for good measure. The parking lot at the end is just large enough to park and turn around in. I think next time I’ll skip the Picnic Area.

Milepost 340
Crabtree Meadows Campground

NPS Camping page  ♦  Campground Site Map

CrabtreeFalls-MeAfter leaving KOA Asheville East, we only made it 53 miles before our next overnight stop at Crabtree Meadows Campground. Besides the stuff we saw outlined above, there are just so many pulloffs to stop and gawk at and it’s ridiculous to try to rush through this little slice of heaven.

Crabtree Falls is the only NPS campground along the Parkway where you can’t make advance reservations; all sites are first come-first served. Although I only planned on one night here, I ended up staying an extra night to do the trail to Crabtree Falls. Here’s my MaliasRV page about that hike.

Milepost 316
Linville Falls

NPS Camping page  ♦  Campground Site Map

It wasn’t time for an overnight stop when I got to Linville Falls Campground since it’s only 24 miles north of where we stayed at Crabtree Meadows. But I drove through to check it out anyway.

Linville-Area-A

Area A

Linville-Area-B

Area B

This is the entrance to Area A. The first pull-through you see on the left is A-6.

The site map shows both A & B areas (total of 70 sites – some double-wides) available for RVs and tents.

Linville Falls Hike:  Linville Falls is the most famous waterfall in the Blue Ridge and it starts at this visitor center. Since I heard you have to allow 1-3 hours depending on which falls you want to see, I decided to do this another time since mom wasn’t capable of this hike and I didn’t want to leave her alone that long.

Linville Falls Picnic Area is RV friendly with plenty parking and turn-around area, plus it is very pretty and shaded.

RVParkReviews.com – What other campers say about Linville Falls Campground.

Milepost 312
Grandfather Mountain

2050 Blowing Rock Hwy. ♦ Linville, NC ♦ 800-468-7325

Although the view of Grandfather Mountain is at the Parkway’s Milepost 306, you need to exit here (if you’re heading north) and take SR 181 and US 281 and go through the town of Linville to get there for a visit.

GrandfatherMt-Me&Bridge

I first saw a brochure for this attraction when I visited the Asheville area in December 2001. I really wanted to see that “mile-high swinging bridge,” but at that time temps were in the 20’s with 50 mph winds on the bridge and it was closed). I always wanted to return when I could really explore here. It took 6 years, but my plan finally came together!

I wouldn’t have wanted to do this road in the motorhome, but it sure was great in the tow car. I didn’t realize this was a road scene used in the movie Forest Gump and is now called Forest Gump Curve.

Here’s page I did about the 2007 visit until I get it updated.

And MaliasRV page for the part with my mom.

Grandfather Campground

125 Profile View Road ♦ Banner Elk, NC ♦ 800-788-2582

GrandfatherCG-1 GrandfatherCG-2In checking out the map of the area, this looked like the best place from which to explore Grandfather Mountain and I’d been looking forward to that visit for a long time. It was great to have full hookups again for a while and get caught up with laundry, shopping, etc. I really enjoyed my stay here and here is link to page I did about that 2007 visit.

See directions on how they suggest to get there and what to avoid.

Milepost 308
Flat Rock Trail

FlatRockTrail-HighCountryHost

Photo credit: High Country Host

High Country Host: If you’re looking for a trail in the High Country area requiring only a moderate effort but offering a reward of a top-notch view, the Flat Rock Trail is for you. A fairly easy slightly uphill walk of less than 20 minutes leads you to what is sort of a big flat rock at the top of the hill.

An easy self guiding loop that totals .63 mi.  There is a nice view at the Flat Rock Parking Overlook, but in this case you must hike to it. A short loop trail starts behind the overlook identification sign. Though you ultimately end up at the top of a small, granite outcrop that is part of Grandfather Mountain, the hike is not all that hard.  (I didn’t get to do this on my 2007 trip, but I’m including it here to check out next time.)

Milepost 306
Grandfather Mountain Overlook

BlueRidge-Grandfather-Mountain-OverlookAccording to the NPs site, “one of the best southern views of Grandfather Mountain. You might notice how the mountain also resembles the head of a hawk–which also explains the Cherokee name “Tanawa” meaning hawk.” When I passed by here, I didn’t see the resemblance to either one, although the outline of grandfather was easily seen from Grandfather Campground.

Milepost 304
Linn Cove Viaduct

LinnCoveViaduct

Linn Cove Viaduct – Summer

LinnCoveViaduct-Fall

Linn Cove Viaduct – Fall

The Linn Cove Viaduct hugs the face of Grandfather Mountain and is recognized internationally as an engineering marvel. I had seen this picture countless times while researching the parkway – sometimes with rhododendron in the foreground and other times with brilliantly colored fall leaves.

I was fortunate enough to see it in both summer and fall, and my pictures aren’t as dramatic as I would have liked, but the view was still phenomenal.

This bridge was engineered to wrap around the mountain, not cut into it to minimize the impact on the fragile environment here. There’s good RV parking at the Linn Cove visitor’s center. Ask there exactly where to go to get this shot. You can also hike down a trail to get a view of the underbelly of the viaduct.

MaliasRV page about being here with my mom.

arrow-rightNext Stop: Mileposts 200 or go back to Main Blue Ridge Parkway page

NPS Map of entire Parkway

NPS Map of Mileposts 210-325 only

NPS Map of Mileposts 325-469 only

It’s all about sharing what we know with other RVers, so if you have anything to add about your stay on the Parkway, I’d love to hear from you in Comments below!

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

divider-greenMailboxYour comments and feedback matter to me. The only way I know if this site is of any value to you is if you tell me about it. I love hearing from you and my mailbox is always open. Contact me or please leave comments above. Comments from folks who have "journeyed" with me at Malia's Mailbox.

Powered by WordPress. Designed by Woo Themes