Dry Weight Vs GVWR Vs UVW: RV Weights Explained

When you’re traveling with an RV, there are a lot of weight ratings to consider. They all have their own acronyms and it can be confusing to understand what they mean.

Here’s a quick guide to help you understand the difference between UVW, GVWR, and dry weight.

UVW stands for unloaded vehicle weight, GVWR stands for gross vehicle weight rating, and dry weight is just another name for the unloaded vehicle weight.

UVW Vs GVWR Vs Dry Weight

What Does GVWR Mean On A Camper?

The gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) is the maximum permissible weight of the fully-loaded vehicle. This includes the net curb weight of the vehicle plus all occupants, cargo, and trailer tongue weight.

GVWR – dry weight = the payload capacity of your trailer, which is the maximum amount of weight you can load into it.

You can exceed your GVWR, but only if you are within the manufacturer’s recommended towing capacity.

Exceeding your GVWR will put stress on your vehicle and may cause premature wear and tear.

Is GVWR the same as towing capacity?

No, GVWR is the total weight of the vehicle and everything in it, while towing capacity is the maximum amount of weight your vehicle can pull behind it.

Related;

What Does UVW Mean?

The unloaded vehicle weight (UVW) is the typical weight of the RV when it’s not carrying any cargo, water, or other gear.

This is also known as the “dry weight.” UVW is the weight of your trailer after the manufacturer builds it and includes everything that it comes with from the factory.

However, this weight does not include anything extra you may have installed after you buy it, like air conditioners. It also doesn’t include the weight of any water you may have in your tanks or any gear you’re carrying.

To get an accurate measurement of your RV’s UVW, you’ll need to weigh it without any additional gear or water.

Many RV owners will take their trailer to a truck stop and use the public scales. This is the best way to get an accurate measurement of your RV’s UVW.

Does UVW include hitch weight?

No, the UVW does not include the weight of the trailer hitch. The hitch weight is the amount of weight that is transferred to the tow vehicle by the trailer tongue.

It’s typically equal to about 10-15% of the trailer’s total weight.

Dry Weight VS GVWR: What’s The Difference?

The dry weight is the weight of your RV without any fluids, gear, or people. This is also known as the “unloaded vehicle weight” (UVW).

The GVWR, on the other hand, is the maximum permissible weight of your fully-loaded RV. This includes the net curb weight of your RV plus all occupants, cargo, and trailer tongue weight.

To sum it up, the dry weight is the starting point for your RV’s GVWR. The GVWR is the maximum weight of your RV when it’s fully loaded with people, gear, and everything else.

Other RV Weight Ratings You Need To Know

These aren’t the only weight ratings you’ll need to know if you’re pulling a trailer or driving an RV.

There are a few others to keep in mind.

GAWR

The gross axle weight rating (GAWR) is the maximum permissible weight that can be carried by each axle. This includes the net curb weight of the vehicle plus all occupants, cargo, and trailer tongue weight.

GCWR

The gross combined weight rating (GCWR) is the total weight of your RV and everything you’re pulling behind it. This includes the GVWR of your RV plus the GVWR of your car, boat, or trailer.

You should always make sure you stay within the manufacturer’s recommended towing capacity and GVWR. Exceeding these limits will put stress on your vehicle and may cause premature wear and tear.

Tongue Weight

The tongue weight is the portion of the trailer’s weight that rests on the hitch. It’s typically 10-15% of the total trailer weight.

Payload Capacity

The payload capacity is the amount of weight your RV can carry, including all occupants, cargo, and water. The payload capacity is different than the GVWR because it doesn’t include the weight of the RV itself.

Cargo Carrying Capacity

The cargo carrying capacity (CCC) is the amount of weight your RV can carry, including all occupants and trailer tongue weight. This is just another term for payload capacity.

Conclusion 

Now that you know the difference between all of these RV weight ratings, you can be sure to stay within the limits set by the manufacturer.

This will help keep your RV safe and ensure that it lasts for many years to come.

Madeline Cooper
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