How Much Can a Class A Motorhome Tow? (20 Examples)

Class A motorhomes are the largest and most expensive type of RV. They are also the most powerful and can tow the most weight. Most Class A motorhomes can tow between 5,000 and 10,000 pounds. Some models can tow even more.

If you’re planning to do a lot of towing with your motorhome, you’ll want to make sure that it can handle the weight of your trailer or boat.

You’ll also need to factor in the weight of any cargo you’re carrying. The best way to do this is to consult your motorhome’s owner’s manual.

How Much Can A Class A Motorhome Tow

How Much Can I Tow With A Class A Motorhome?

The answer to this question depends on a few factors, such as the make and model of your motorhome, the type of engine it has, and its Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR).

The GVWR is the maximum weight that your motorhome can safely carry. This includes the weight of the vehicle itself, any passengers, cargo, and the tongue weight of the trailer or boat being towed.

Most Class A motorhomes have a GVWR between 15,000 and 30,000 pounds. This means that they can usually tow between 5,000 and 10,000 pounds without exceeding their GVWR.

Some high-end Class A motorhomes can tow even more weight. For example, the 2018 Fleetwood Bounder 36F has a GVWR of 22,000 pounds and can tow up to 10,000 pounds.

To get an accurate estimate of how much your motorhome can tow, consult the owner’s manual or contact the manufacturer.

Class A Motorhome Towing Capacity Chart

ModelLengthGVWRTowing Capacity
Coachmen Cross Country41 feet29,500 pounds10,000 pounds
Damon Astoria38 feet26,000 pounds7500 pounds
Fleetwood Bounder36 feet22,000 pounds10,000 pounds
Forest River Georgetown35 feet28,000 pounds7,500 pounds
Holiday Rambler Vacationer34 feet28,000 pounds7,500 pounds
Jayco Seneca39 feet26,000 pounds10,000 pounds
Newmar Dutch Star38-43 feet42,000 pounds15,000 pounds
Tiffin Allegro Bus41 feet45,000 pounds15,000 pounds
Winnebago Journey35.5 feet32,000 pounds15,000 pounds
Jayco Alante28.5 feet23,000 pounds5000 pounds
Winnebago Sunstar35 feet23,000 pounds5000 pounds
Fleetwood Flair29 feet21,000 pounds8000 pounds
Coachmen Mirada35 feet26,000 pounds8000 pounds
Thor Motor Coach Palazzo35 feet30,000 pounds10,000 pounds
Holiday Rambler Navigator38.5 feet33,000 pounds10,000 pounds
Fleetwood Discovery40 feet46,400 pounds10,000 pounds
Tiffin Phaeton38.5 feet48,320 pounds10,000 pounds
Thor Motor Coach Tuscany41 feet48,600 pounds15,000 pounds
Winnebago Vista30 feet23,000 pounds5000 pounds

Factors That Affect The Towing Capacity Of Your Class A Motorhome

There are a few factors that can affect the towing capacity of your Class A motorhome, such as the type of engine it has and its GVWR.

1. Engine: The type of engine your motorhome has will play a big role in how much weight it can tow. Gasoline engines are less powerful than diesel engines, so they won’t be able to tow as much weight.

2. GVWR: The GVWR is the maximum weight that your motorhome can safely carry. This includes the weight of the vehicle itself, any passengers, cargo, and the tongue weight of the trailer or boat being towed. If your motorhome exceeds its GVWR, it could be at risk of overloading and becoming unsafe to drive.

3. Transmission: Some transmissions are better suited for towing than others. Automatic transmissions are usually better for towing than manual transmissions because they can handle the increased stress of towing.

4. Tires: The type of tires your motorhome has will also affect its towing capacity. All-terrain tires are designed to handle more weight and provide better traction than regular passenger car tires.

5. Axles: The number of axles on your motorhome will also play a role in its towing capacity. Motorhomes with two axles can usually tow more weight than those with only one axle.

Related: Where to find Dexter Axle serial numbers.

Understanding Class A Motorhome Weights & Limits

When shopping for a Class A motorhome, it’s important to understand the different weights and limits that are associated with these vehicles.

class A RV dolly towing

GVWR

The Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) is the maximum weight that your motorhome can safely carry.

This includes the weight of the vehicle itself, any passengers, cargo, and the tongue weight of the trailer or boat being towed.

If your motorhome exceeds its GVWR, it could be at risk of overloading and becoming unsafe to drive.

GCWR

The Gross Combined Weight Rating (GCWR) is the maximum weight of your motorhome and any trailer or boat that it’s towing.

This rating is important to consider because it can help you avoid overloading your vehicle and causing damage to the engine, transmission, or axles.

To determine the GCWR of your vehicle, simply add the GVWR of your motorhome to the trailer or boat’s GVW.

Towing Capacity

The towing capacity is the maximum weight that your motorhome can safely tow.

This rating is different from the GVWR and GCWR because it only takes into account the weight of the trailer or boat being towed, not the weight of the vehicle itself or any passengers or cargo.

OCCC

The Occupant and Cargo Carrying Capacity (OCCC) is the maximum weight that your motorhome can carry, including passengers and cargo.

This rating is important to consider because it can help you avoid overloading your vehicle and causing damage to the engine, transmission, or axles.

To determine the OCCC of your vehicle, simply subtract the vehicle’s GVWR from its GCWR.

Curb Weight

The curb weight is the weight of your motorhome without any passengers or cargo. It’s sometimes also called dry weight.

This rating is important to consider because it can help you determine how much weight your vehicle can safely carry.

To determine the curb weight of your vehicle, simply subtract the OCCC from the GCWR.

Payload Capacity

The payload capacity is the maximum weight that your motorhome can carry, including passengers and cargo.

This rating is important to consider because it can help you avoid overloading your vehicle and causing damage to the engine, transmission, or axles.

To determine the payload capacity of your vehicle, simply subtract the Curb Weight from the GVWR.

Tongue Weight Rating

The Tongue Weight Rating (TWR) is the maximum weight that your motorhome can safely tow.

This rating is different from the towing capacity because it only takes into account the weight of the trailer or boat being towed, not the weight of the vehicle itself or any passengers or cargo.

Gross Axle Weight Rating

The Gross Axle Weight Rating (GAWR) is the maximum weight that your motorhome’s axle can safely carry.

This rating is important to consider because it can help you avoid overloading your vehicle and causing damage to the engine, transmission, or axles.

To determine the GAWR of your vehicle, simply add the Curb Weight to the Tongue Weight Rating.

Now that you understand the different weights and limits associated with Class A motorhomes, you can start shopping for the right vehicle for your needs.

Keep these ratings in mind as you compare different models to find the one that’s right for you.

Different Towing Methods Explained 

There are three different types of towing that you’ll need to know about when shopping for a Class A motorhome. These are flat towing, dolly towing, and trailer towing.

Car Hauler (Trailer Towing)

The car hauler, or trailer towing, method is one of the most common types of towing for Class A motorhomes. This method involves hitching your vehicle to a trailer that carries your car behind the motorhome.

You drive your car up onto the trailer, strap it down, and then hitch the trailer to your motorhome.

This type of towing is great for long-distance trips because it allows you to bring your car with you without having to worry about driving it or putting strain on the tires, wheels, or transmission.

Flat Towing (Four Down Method, Dinghy Towing)

Flat towing, also known as the four down method or dinghy towing, is a type of towing where your vehicle is towed behind the motorhome with all four wheels on the ground.

This type of towing is great for short distances. It’s also a good option if you don’t want to deal with the hassle of hitching up a trailer.

The only downside to flat towing is that it can be difficult to maneuver your vehicle if it’s not properly equipped for this type of towing.

Make sure you consult your owner’s manual or the manufacturer before attempting to flat tow your vehicle.

It’s also important to ensure that you put your car in neutral if you’re going to be flat towing it. This will prevent the transmission from being damaged during the tow.

Tow Dolly

Dolly towing is another common type of towing for Class A motorhomes. It is a type of towing where the front wheels of your car are not on the ground.

The car is hitched to a dolly, which is then hitched to the back of the motorhome. This type of towing is great for short trips because it takes less strain off of the tires and transmission.

Typically, dolly towing is used for towing vehicles that are not four-wheel drive because the front wheels aren’t on the ground.

What’s The Best Class A Motorhome For Towing?

Now that you know the different types of towing and the weights and limits associated with Class A motorhomes, you can start shopping for the right vehicle for your needs.

Keep these ratings in mind as you compare different models to find the one that’s right for you.

In my opinion, the best Class A motorhome for towing is the Thor Axis. This motorhome has a GVWR of 22,000 pounds and a towing capacity of 5,000 pounds. It also has a gross axle weight rating of 7,500 pounds.

The Thor Axis is a great option for towing because it’s big enough to tow a trailer or car hauler but not so big that it’s difficult to maneuver.

It’s also a great choice if you’re looking for a motorhome that can accommodate a family or group of friends.

Thor is one of the leading manufacturers of motorhomes and RVs. They build quality vehicles that are designed to last. The Thor Axis is a great example of their commitment to quality and craftsmanship.

The Thor Axis comes with a variety of features that make it a great choice for towing.

It has plenty of storage space for your belongings, and it comes with a generator so you can power your RV when you’re not plugged into an electrical outlet.

It also has a comfortable interior with plenty of seating and sleeping space. The full kitchen includes a refrigerator, stove, oven, and microwave.

The bathroom is spacious and includes a shower, toilet, and sink. The Thor Axis also has a television and DVD player so you can relax after a long day of driving.

Specs:

  • GVWR: 22,000 pounds
  • Towing capacity: 5,000 pounds
  • Gross axle weight rating: 7,500 pounds
  • Sleeps up to 8 people
  • Length: 25 feet
  • Width: 8 feet 6 inches
  • Height: 11 feet 3 inches
Madeline Cooper
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