iCamp Elite Vs Scamp Trailer: Here’s The Winner

Small travel trailers offer a lot of benefits. In addition to being more affordable than large models, they’re also more maneuverable and easier to tow. But with so many different small travel trailers on the market, it can be hard to know which one is right for you.

If you’re considering a small travel trailer, two of the most popular options are the iCamp Elite and the Scamp Trailer.

Both of these trailers offer a lot of features and benefits, so I’ve put together a comparison of the iCamp Elite and Scamp Trailer.

InfoiCamp EliteScamp 13Scamp 16Scamp 19
Weight2890 lbs1500 lbs1900 lbsUnknown
Height8 feet 1 inch7 feet 6 inches7 feet 10 inches8 feet 10 inches
Sleeps22-32-34
Made InUSAUSAUSAUSA
BuildFiberglass/
steel frame
Fiberglass/
steel frame
Fiberglass/
steel frame
Fiberglass/
steel frame
Price$11,000+$13,000+$17,000+$24,000+
Holds Value8.5/107/107/107/10

iCamp Elite Vs Scamp Trailer: Comparison

iCamp Elite Vs Scamp Trailer
Source: Andrew Duthie / FlickrCC.

This in-depth comparison of the iCamp Elite and Scamp Trailer will help you decide which is the best option for your needs, from size and dimensions to interior features and safety.

Weight

The iCamp Elite has a GVWR of 2,890 pounds. This incredibly light teardrop trailer can be pulled by nearly anything. It can carry 524 pounds of cargo and the hitch weight is only 236 pounds.

The Scamp trailer’s weight depends on the model you choose. The 13-foot Scamp trailer just barely registers on the scale at 1,500 pounds and a 200-pound tongue weight.

The 16-foot options is slightly heavier at 1,900 pounds. However, Scamp doesn’t publish the weight of the totally adorable 19-foot fifth wheel, so your guess is as good as mine.

It’s pretty clear that Scamp offers the lightest of the two options.

Height

The iCamp elite has an external eight of 8 feet 1 inch, which is incredibly manageable when considering your clearance.

In fact, that’s no taller than even the largest heavy duty pickup, so you’ll have no problems fitting in. The interior height is 5 feet 11 inches, so while it’s not quite tall enough for the tallest people, those of average height won’t have to duck.

Scamp trailer heights are a bit illusive. They don’t actually publisize them on their website. I had to do a bit of digging to find them, and I’m not sure these are entirely accurate, but they should be close.

The 13-foot Scamp trailer is 7 feet 6 inches, the 16-foot is 7 feet 10 inches, and the 19-foot fifth wheel si 8 feet 10 inches. There are two options shorter than the iCamp and one that is taller.

Information I found indicated that the interior height of the 13-foot Scamp is 5 feet 10 inches and the interior height of the 16-foot is 6 feet 3 inches.

However, another source claimed that both interior heights were the same. I couldn’t find any information on the fifth wheel interior height, but a safe assumption would be that it’s at least as roomy as the 16-foot trailer.

Sleeping Capacity

Sleeping capacity of the iCamp Elite is 2 adults. The dinette by day converts to a 5’4″ x 6’3″ bed at night. That’s a little bit bigger than a full size bed but not quite as big as a queen.

If you had a small child, you may be able to work the sleeping capacity up to 3, but it would be tight.

The 13-foot and 16-foot Scamp trailers are about the same as the iCamp Elite. They sleep 2 people on the dinette that converts to a bed. However, they also have a spare set of bunks at the front of the trailer for an extra person or two.

The 19-foot Scamp fifth wheel could sleep up to 4 because it has a dedicated bedroom at the front with an optional dinette conversion.

Features

The iCamp Elite comes standard with plenty of features to keep you comfortable and maximize utility in such a small space.

The entry door has a screen so you can open it up for air flow in nice weather. Every window has a glass slider with a screen as well.

The dinette’s adjustable table allows you to accommodate additional people at meal time if needed with plenty of overhead cabinet space, stainless steel sink, and LP burners.

There’s a wardrobe for your clothes and the spacious wet bath has a marine toilet with a sink. The 1.9 cubic foot 3-way refrigerator makes it easy to boondock and still have power for everything you need.

Of course, you should expect no less than an LP gas detector and a smoke detector for safety. A porch light allows you to enjoy the outdoors, even in the dark while a powered roof vent eliminates odors.

If you’d like to throw in some upgrades, there’s an optional flat screen TV, DVD video/audio system, Apple iPod connection, furnace, air conditioning unit, a fresh water hose, an LP cylinder, and a spare tire.

As for the Scamp, every size has roughly the same features. For instance, you can opt for a floorplan with or without a bathroom in any of their availble sizes.

Standard features include a 2-burner stove, AC prep, spare tire, mounted rear jacks, LED exterior lights, an outside GFCI outlet, tank monitors,  roof vent, USB station, and room darkening blinds.

If you felt so inclined, you could add on a dry flush toilet, an air conditioner, glass stove top, electric brakes, backup camera, 12-foot awning, antenna, cable hookup, generator, outdoor shower, solar panel kit, or aluminum wheel upgrade.

Build Quality/Where They Are Made

Most of the components for the iCamp Elite are made in the United States and all trailers are assembled in the United States as well. They have a powder-coated steel frame with a rubber torsion axle for maximum durability.

The foam body is laminated with an aluminum frame while a high-gloss fiberglass exterior skin coats the entire outside of the trailer. The floor is made of four layers of laminated material while cabinets are vacuum-formed for durability.

The tow bar with safety chains and electric brakes offer plenty of safety while an aerodynamic design makes them easy to tow for nearly any vehicle.

Scamp trailers is based in Backas, Minnesota and all trailer parts and accessories are made and assembled here. Much like iCamp, these trailers are fiberglass on a steel frame, made for lightweight and aerodynamic towing.

Standard trailer floorplans feature fiberglass interior cabinetry while delixe trailers have wood cabinets. These cabinets actually help support the trailer’s frame and shouldn’t be removed. The roof and walls are insulated with double-bubble foil.

The fiberglass floor is made of only one layer which isn’t quite as good as the iCamp, but the windows are Plexiglass and very durable.

Price

Neither iCamp nor Scamp like to publish their pricing, so you’ll get different numbers depending on where you look.

But, like all trailers, the price will vary based on the features and floor plan you choose, so these rough estimates may help.

The iCamp Elite only has one floor plan, so depending on features, you’ll pay between $11,000 and $14,000 for a trailer.

Because Scamp has several different models with multiple floor plan options, their pricing varies a bit more. You’re look at around $13,000 for the low-end 13-foot model and about $24,000 for a fully-loaded fifth wheel.

Holding Their Value

The iCamp Elite and Scamp both hold their value well, but the iCamp Elite may have a slight edge. Because of their fairly new reputation in the United States, buyers are willing to pay a bit more for an iCamp Elite than a used Scamp.

However, both brands are highly sought after and incredibly affordable, so you’ll be able to sell either one for a good price down the road.

Plus, if you’re looking to purchase a used one, you’ll save some money over a new model and know you’re getting a quality product.

iCamp Elite Pros & Cons

The iCamp Elite has a few advantages over the Scamp, but it really comes down to personal preference.

Pros

  • Easy to tow
  • Lightweight and aerodynamic
  • Excellent build quality
  • Vacuum-formed cabinets
  • Components made in the USA

Cons

  • No bathroom option
  • Available in one size
  • Fewer floor plan options

Scamp Trailer Pros & Cons

The Scamp also has a few advantages, but again, it comes down to personal preference.

Pros

  • More floor plan options
  • Several bathroom layouts
  • Greater sleeping capacity
  • Components made in the USA

Cons

  • One-layer fiberglass floor
  • No air conditioning option

Other Small Campers To Consider

There are a few other small campers on the market that may fit your needs. These options don’t have as many features as the iCamp Elite or Scamp, but they’re still great trailers.

Casita Spirit Deluxe

If you want a lightweight trailer with all the basics, the Casita Spirit Deluxe is a great option. It’s small and easy to tow but still has a queen bed, kitchen, and bathroom. You won’t find any fancy features, but it’s a great basic trailer.

This trailer is nearly identical to the Scamp, but costs a bit more. The interior is slightly more functional, with the standard version sleeping up to 5 people.

However, the deluxe model has a full-size shower, which you can’t put a price on when you’re camping.

Basecamp by Airstream

The Basecamp by Airstream is perfect for those who want a little more space than the iCamp Elite offers.

This adorable little tear drop has a kitchen, bathroom, and sleeping for four, plus some extra storage. It’s still lightweight and easy to tow but may be a better fit for families.

It features solar protection on the tinted windows to keep the interior cool plus easy access via a rear hatch.

There’s an exterior shower and windows all the way around for an epic 360-degree view wherever you’re camping. Plus, every model has a bathroom.

You’ll get the same classic design and durable construction you know to expect from Airstream, which is what makes this model highly appealing. However, you’ll pay a lot more for this because of the increased quality and features.

Escape Pod by Horizon

The Escape Pod by Horizon is a great option if you want something even lighter and more aerodynamic than the iCamp Elite. This camper is so lightweight that it can be towed by most SUVs and some smaller trucks.

It features a kitchen, dinette area, and sleeping for two people. Plus, there’s a wet bath with a shower, toilet, and sink all in one room.

This model also has some great exterior storage options and an awning for extra shade and protection. This is great, because both the iCamp Elite and the Scamp trailers only offer an awning as an optional feature.

The major downside to this camper is that it doesn’t have any holding tanks. That means you’ll need to be near a full hookup campsite or have a way to haul water with you. Otherwise, it’s a great little camper with a lot to offer.

Forest River R-Pod

The Forest River R-Pod is a popular option for those who want a lightweight trailer with all the amenities. This camper has a kitchen, bathroom, and sleeping for four people. Plus, there are tons of floor plan options to choose from so you can find the perfect one for your needs.

This trailer is very similar to the iCamp Elite in terms of features and floor plans. However, it’s a bit heavier, so you’ll need a larger vehicle to tow it. It also doesn’t have the same high-quality construction or finishings as the iCamp Elite, which is why it’s a bit cheaper.

Meaner Bean

The unique thing about this little camper is that it removes the through axle so your ground clearance is the same from the front of the trailer to the back. This makes it the perfect trailer for off road adventures.

It’s a premium product with rugged durability and all of the amenities you’ll need. However, it’s a bit pricey and it’s really only suited for 1-2 people because it’s certainly not very roomy.

The idea here is that you enjoy the outdoors and just need a place to sleep at night without pitching a tent.

Verdict 

So, which camper is right for you? If you’re looking for the most lightweight and aerodynamic option, go with the iCamp Elite. If you need a little more space or want to have the option of a bathroom, go with the Scamp.

If you find that neither of these works for you, now you know there are quite a few small models on the market from which you can choose.

Madeline Cooper
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