RV Propane Not Flowing? Troubleshooting Guide

Propane powers a lot of things in your RV! If you’re camping during the winter, you need it for your furnace. If you do any cooking, you’ll need it for your oven or stove.

There are a few reasons why your RV propane may not be flowing properly.

The most common reason is that the regulator isn’t set correctly. If the regulator is set too low, the propane won’t flow. Another common reason is there’s a blockage in the line somewhere between the tank and the appliances. Lastly, it could just be that the appliances aren’t turned on properly.

RV propane not flowing

RV Propane Not Flowing: Troubleshooting Guide

There are plenty of reasons why your propane may not be flowing, and many of them you can troubleshoot yourself without the help of a professional.

1. Make Sure The Propane Valve Is On

The first thing you should check is whether the propane valve itself is turned on. It’s not uncommon for people to mistakenly turn off the valve when they’re finished using propane-powered appliances.

It’s also easy to forget to turn the valve back on after switching over to a new tank. Simply look at your propane tank and make sure the valved is turned to the “on” position.

If the valve is off, simply turn it clockwise to the “on” position.

2. Check The Excess Flow Valve

The excess flow valve is a safety device that shuts off the flow of propane if there’s a leak in the system. The excess flow valve is located near the propane tank.

If the excess flow valve is triggered, it needs to be reset before the propane will flow again. To do this, simply turn the knob on the valve to the “off” position and then back to the “on” position.

3. Adjust The Regulator

If the propane valve and excess flow valve are both turned on and working properly, the next thing you should check is the regulator. The regulator is what controls the flow of propane from the tank to the appliances.

If the regulator is set too low, the propane won’t flow. To adjust the regulator, simply turn the knob clockwise to increase the pressure.

4. Check For Obstructions

If there’s an obstruction in the line between the tank and the appliances, the propane won’t be able to flow. The most common type of obstruction is a blockage in the regulator itself.

To clean the regulator, simply remove it from the tank and blow out any debris with compressed air.

If there’s an obstruction further down the line, you’ll need to track down the source of the obstruction and remove it. This is best done by a professional.

5. Check The Appliances

Finally, make sure the appliances are turned on properly. If you’ve exhausted all of your other options, make sure that the reason your appliances aren’t getting propane isn’t because of user error.

Camper RV Propane Stove

How Do You Purge A Propane Regulator?

If you’re having trouble with your RV propane regulator, one thing you can try is purging it. This simply means letting the propane out of the regulator so that any dirt or debris can be blown out.

To purge a propane regulator, follow these steps:

  1. Turn off all appliances that use propane. Simply take a quick walk through your RV to make sure that your stove, oven, furnace, and any other appliances that use propane are turned off.
  2. Turn off the propane tank valve. Check to make sure that the valve on your propane tank is turned counterclockwise to the “off” position.
  3. Disconnect the regulator from the tank. Once the propane tank valve is off, you can safely disconnect the regulator from the tank.
  4. Open the bleed screw. The bleed screw is located on the side of the regulator. To open it, simply turn it counterclockwise a few turns.
  5. Let the propane out of the regulator. You should hear a hissing sound as the propane escapes from the regulator. Let it out until the hissing stops.
  6. Close the bleed screw. Once the hissing has stopped, you can close the bleed screw by turning it clockwise a few turns.
  7. Reconnect the regulator to the tank. Make sure that the connection is tight so that there’s no chance of a leak.
  8. Turn on the tank valve. Make sure that the tank valve is turned clockwise to the “on” position.
  9. Check for leaks. Once the regulator is reconnected and the tank valve is turned on, you should check for leaks. The best way to do this is with soapy water. Simply apply the soapy water to all of the connections and watch for bubbles. If you see any bubbles, that means there’s a leak.
  10. Turn on the appliances. Once you’ve confirmed that there are no leaks, you can turn on the appliances one by one. Start with the ones that use the most propane first.

If you follow these steps, you should be able to purge your propane regulator and get it working properly again. If you’re still having trouble, or if you can’t find the bleed screw, it’s best to consult a professional.

How Do You Know When A Propane Regulator Goes Bad?

There are a few signs that your propane regulator might be going bad. If you notice any of these signs, it’s best to replace the regulator as soon as possible.

  1. Leaks: One of the most common signs that a propane regulator is going bad is leaks. If you see bubbles around any of the connections, that means there’s a leak. This is especially true if you see bubbles when the regulator is turned off.
  2. Hissing sound: Another sign that your propane regulator might be going bad is a hissing sound. If you hear a hissing sound coming from the regulator, it could be an indication of a leak.
  3. Frozen regulator: If you live in a cold climate, your propane regulator might freeze. This can happen if there’s moisture in the regulator. To thaw a frozen regulator, simply apply heat to it with a hair dryer or a heat gun.
  4. Corroded connections: Over time, the connections on your propane regulator can become corroded. This can cause problems with the regulator’s performance. If you notice that the connections are corroded, it’s best to replace the regulator.
  5. Inconsistent pressure: One of the things that a propane regulator does is maintain consistent pressure. If you notice that the pressure is fluctuating, it could be an indication that the regulator is going bad.

These are just a few of the signs that your propane regulator might be going bad. If you notice any of these signs, it’s best to replace the regulator as soon as possible.

Related;

How Do You Get Air Out Of RV Propane Line?

Air in your propane line can cause all sorts of problems. It can cause your appliances to malfunction, and it can even prevent them from igniting.

The best way to get air out of your propane line is to bleed the line. This will allow the air to escape and the propane to flow freely.

Simply follow the same steps above to purge the regulator. This will ensure that all air is purged from the line as well.

There are plenty of reasons why propane may not be flowing through your RV properly. You can usually troubleshoot these issues yourself, but if you have any trouble, it’s best to consult a professional.

Madeline Cooper