What Size Wire For 50 AMP RV Service?

Wiring a pedestal for 50 amp RV service can be very useful when you want to park your RV on your own property or allow other people with RVs to visit. However, using the correct wire size is incredibly important because electricity can be dangerous.

The most common wire size for 50 amp RV service is 8 gauge, but depending on how much power your RV draws continuously, how far you need to run the power, and several other factors, you may need to use a larger or smaller wire type.

What Size Wire For 50 AMP RV Service

About 50 AMP RV Plugs

There are a few different types of 50 AMP RV plugs and receptacles, but they all serve the same purpose – to provide power to your RV.

The most common type of 50 AMP RV plug is the NEMA 14-50. This plug is typically used for RVs that have a 50 Amp service panel.

The NEMA 14-50 plug has four prongs – two hot (live) wires, a neutral wire, and a ground wire. The hot wires are typically colored red and black, while the neutral wire is white and the ground wire is green.

Gauge & AWG Meaning

The gauge of the wire refers to its thickness, and the lower the number, the thicker the wire. For example, 8 gauge is thicker than 10 gauge.

AWG stands for American Wire Gauge. This is the standard that most wires are measured by in the United States.

When it comes to 50 AMP RV service, you will typically see two different sizes of wire – 6 AWG and 8 AWG.

6 AWG wire is the thicker of the two and is typically used for 50 AMP service panels that are 50 feet or less from the power source.

8 AWG wire is thinner and is typically used for service panels that are further than 50 feet from the power source.

Choosing the right size wire is important, as using a wire that is too thin can cause it to overheat and possibly start a fire.

Does Wire Size Really Matter?

When wiring a 50 AMP RV plug, it is important to use the correct gauge wire. The recommended wire size for a 50 Amp circuit is 8 AWG. This wire is rated for 50 Amps and can handle up to 30 Amps of continuous draw.

If you are using a NEMA 14-50 plug for your RV, you will need to use two hot wires (red and black), a neutral wire (white), and a ground wire (green). The recommended wire size for each of these wires is 8 AWG.

If you have any questions about what size wire to use for your RV, please consult an electrician or a qualified RV technician.

Wire size does matter when wiring a 50 AMP RV plug. If you use a wire that is too small, it could overheat and cause a fire. Use the correct size wire to prevent this from happening.

8 AWG is the recommended size for a 50 Amp circuit. This wire can handle up to 30 Amps of continuous draw. If your RV draws more than 30 Amps, you may need to upgrade to a larger wire size.

What Wire Size Do You Need For A 50 AMP RV Service?

The most common wire size used for 50 amp service is 8 gauge. This wire is rated for 50 amps and can handle up to 30 amps of continuous draw with intermittent spurts of up to 50 amps.

If your RV draws more than 30 amps continuously, you may need to upgrade to a larger wire size to handle the load.

10 gauge wire is a solid choice for 50 amp service if you’re worried about the load size or the amount of power you’re going to need.

How To Choose The Right Wire Size

Choosing the right wire size is important to prevent your RV from overloading the circuit and causing a fire.

Use 8 AWG wire for most 50 amp circuits. If you have a large RV or one that draws a lot of power, you may need to upgrade to a larger wire size.

Here are some tips for choosing the right wire size for your 50 amps service.

1. Check Your RV Size

Every RV has its own power needs, but larger RVs tend to draw a lot more power. That’s because they have more power outlets, multiple air conditioners, and larger appliances.

If you have a large RV, you may need to use a larger wire size, like 8 or 6 gauge.

2. Check The Appliances In Your RV

The type and number of appliances in your RV will also affect the power needs. If you have multiple air conditioners, a coffee maker, and a microwave, you’re going to need more power than someone who only has a small television and a laptop.

Even if you have a smaller RV, the more electronics you plug in, the more power you’ll need. All appliances have different power requirements.

Some, like air conditioners, require a lot of power to run. Others, like televisions, use less power. You need to know how much power each appliance needs so you can choose the right wire size.

3. Check The Length Of The Circuit

The length of the circuit also affects how much power you need. The longer the circuit, the more power you’ll need to run it without overloading the system.

That’s because electricity dissipates over long distances. If you have a long circuit, you may need to use a larger wire size.

4. Check The Amperage Of Your Circuit Breaker

The amperage of your circuit breaker also affects how much power you need. If your circuit breaker is rated for 50 amps, you can use 8 AWG wire.

But if your circuit breaker is only 30 amps, you can’t use 8 AWG wire because it’s too big. You’ll need to use a smaller wire size, like 10 gauge.

5. Check The Wattage Rating Of Your Electrical Outlets

The wattage rating of your electrical outlets also affects how much power you’ll need. Most standard outlets are rated for 15 amps, but some are only rated for 10 amps.

If you have outlets that are only rated for 10 amps, you’ll need to use a smaller wire size so you don’t overload the circuit.

Guide On Wiring A 50 AMP RV Pedestal

Installing a 50 AMP RV pedestal is a great way to get power to your RV when you’re hooked up to shore power. An RV pedestal is the box you typically see at RV parks But before you can install the pedestal, you need to wire it.

Here’s a guide on how to wire a 50 AMP RV pedestal.

  1. Choose the right location: The first step is to choose the right location for your RV pedestal. You want to make sure it’s in a spot that’s easy to access and close to your RV. You also want to make sure there’s no way for water to get into the box.
  2. Drill holes for the wires: Once you’ve chosen the location, you need to drill holes for the wires. You’ll need two holes: one for the power wire and one for the ground wire.
  3. Run the wires through the holes: Next, you need to run the wires through the holes you just drilled. The power wire should go into the top hole and the ground wire should go into the bottom hole.
  4. Connect the wires to the circuit breaker: Once the wires are in place, you need to connect them to the circuit breaker. The power wire goes on the top terminal and the ground wire goes on the bottom terminal.
  5. Connect the other end of the power wire to your RV: Now you need to connect the other end of the power wire to your RV. The best way to do this is to use an RV-specific power cord. If you don’t have one, you can use a standard extension cord.
  6. Connect the other end of the ground wire to a grounding rod: The final step is to connect the other end of the ground wire to a grounding rod. This will help protect your RV from electrical surges.

Now you know how to wire a 50 AMP RV pedestal. This project is fairly simple and only requires a few tools. But it’s important to make sure you do it right so you don’t damage your RV or your pedestal.

What Size Wire For 50 AMPS At 50, 75, 100 & 150 feet?

50 feet = 10 gauge

75 feet = 8 gauge

100 feet = 6 gauge

150 feet = 4 gauge

These are the American Wire Gauge (AWG) sizes recommended for a 50 AMP circuit at different lengths. These are just general guidelines. Always check with your local building codes to be sure.

What Happens If You Use The Wrong Wire Size For 50 AMP RV Service?

If you use the wrong wire size for 50 AMP RV service, you could overload the circuit and cause a fire. That’s why it’s so important to make sure you use the right size wire.

If you’re not sure, it’s always better to err on the side of caution and use a larger wire size.

Conclusion 

Now you know that the most common wire size for 50 AMP RV service is 8 gauge. However, depending on several different factors, you may have to adjust to a larger or smaller size to accommodate your needs. Just remember to always check with your local building codes to be sure.

Madeline Cooper
Latest posts by Madeline Cooper (see all)